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Noncompliance with the California Contractor's License Law Brings Severe Consequences

Pacific Caisson & Shoring, Inc. v. Bernards Brothers Inc., 236 Cal. App. 4th 1246 (Cal. Ct. App. 2015)

Author: Ted R. Gropman

8/21/2015

Read the full post at Constructlaw

Noncompliance with the California Contractor's License Law Brings Severe Consequences

This article was originally published in the August 2015 issue of ConsensusDocs Construction Law Newsletter.

In California, a contractor must be licensed by the Contractors State License Board (Board) in order to lawfully perform construction operations. The Board issues three types of licenses: an “A,” or general engineering license[1]; a “B,” or general building license[2]; and a series of “C” specialty licenses for trade contractors (e.g., concrete, electrical, glass and glazing, structural steel, drywall, tile, etc.). California Business & Professions Code (B&P) §§ 7056–7058. In order to qualify for a license, a contractor must provide a responsible managing officer (RMO) or a responsible managing employee as its qualifier. B&P § 7068.

The consequences of contracting without the proper license can be severe.